Devilish Rogue of the Heart

 

hiphopfightsback:

Miley Cyrus, this is how twerking is actually done.

Yep, that’s Twerking.

(Source: the-anal-rapist)

the-unpopular-opinions:

My unpopular opinion is that gun piercing is not an acceptable piercing technique. 
Among the general population, whether it’s due to ignorance or just plain stupidity, bluntly shoving jewelry through a person’s ear is completely fine.
I understand the attraction of gun piercing. It seems pretty simple, it can be done at shopping malls, and (because people view modded people as “scary”) it doesn’t involve going to piercing/tattoo parlor. I get it. 
People who work at Claire’s/Icing, Piercing Pagoda and shops similar are not trained in body modification. They don’t even offer proper aftercare advice. 
Gun piercing is horribly damaging to soft tissue and cartilage.
Here’s why needle piercing is preferable 
Here’s more info why going to a place like Claire’s is a bad idea
If you’re scared of going a “scary” shop, here’s a link to find you a member of the APP; they’re not mean or scary I promise. 
tl;dr: Don’t let yourself/your children get gunned. It’s not safe, it’s not healthy, and it’s done by someone who has little to no knowledge of body modification. 
Please don’t butcher yourself, you’re worth more than a mall piercing.

As a graduate of Fakir Body Intensives, these statements are very true. Piercing guns not only are unsterile, they are operated by non-professional body artists. Feeling comfortable and confident with your artist is priority #1. After that it’s all good. :)

the-unpopular-opinions:

My unpopular opinion is that gun piercing is not an acceptable piercing technique. 

Among the general population, whether it’s due to ignorance or just plain stupidity, bluntly shoving jewelry through a person’s ear is completely fine.

I understand the attraction of gun piercing. It seems pretty simple, it can be done at shopping malls, and (because people view modded people as “scary”) it doesn’t involve going to piercing/tattoo parlor. I get it. 

People who work at Claire’s/Icing, Piercing Pagoda and shops similar are not trained in body modification. They don’t even offer proper aftercare advice. 

Gun piercing is horribly damaging to soft tissue and cartilage.

Here’s why needle piercing is preferable 

Here’s more info why going to a place like Claire’s is a bad idea

If you’re scared of going a “scary” shop, here’s a link to find you a member of the APP; they’re not mean or scary I promise. 

tl;dr: Don’t let yourself/your children get gunned. It’s not safe, it’s not healthy, and it’s done by someone who has little to no knowledge of body modification. 

Please don’t butcher yourself, you’re worth more than a mall piercing.

As a graduate of Fakir Body Intensives, these statements are very true. Piercing guns not only are unsterile, they are operated by non-professional body artists.

Feeling comfortable and confident with your artist is priority #1. After that it’s all good. :)

sagansense:

mucholderthen:

FLY-BY OF A SCHWARZSCHILD BLACK HOLEWhat you’re seeing is a sequence of “Einstein Rings” 
Einstein Ring is a term from observational astronomy. It’s an artifact of the gravitational lensing of light (from a star or galaxy) by a massively massive astronomical object (like a black hole or another galaxy). 
In order for an Einstein Ring to appear, all three—the light source, the massive lens, and the observer—must all be aligned. In other words, it occurs when the object that you’re seeing as an Einstein ring is directly behind the object that is the gravitational lens.

Gravitational lensing is predicted by Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Instead of light from a source traveling in a straight line (in three dimensions), it is bent by the presence of a massive body, which distorts spacetime.
The animation above is a simulation depicting a zoom-in on a Schwarzschild black hole in front of the Milky Way.The first Einstein ring corresponds to the most distorted region of the picture and is clearly depicted by the galactic disc. 
The zoom then reveals a series of 4 extra rings, increasingly thinner and closer to the black hole shadow. They are easily seen through the multiple images of the galactic disk. 
The odd-numbered rings correspond to [images of objects] which are behind the black hole (from the observer’s point of view);  they correspond here to the bright yellow region of the galactic disc (close to the galactic center).


The even-numbered rings correspond to images of objects which are behind the observer.  These objects appear bluer since the corresponding part of the galactic disc is thinner and hence dimmer.  [WP]

SOURCE:  Einstein ring - Wikipedia).The animation was created by Wikipedia contributor Urbane Legend.

This is pretty freaking amazing as a gif….wowzer.

sagansense:

mucholderthen:

FLY-BY OF A SCHWARZSCHILD BLACK HOLE
What you’re seeing is a sequence of “Einstein Rings” 

Einstein Ring is a term from observational astronomy. It’s an artifact of the gravitational lensing of light (from a star or galaxy) by a massively massive astronomical object (like a black hole or another galaxy).

In order for an Einstein Ring to appear, all threethe light source, the massive lens, and the observermust all be aligned. In other words, it occurs when the object that you’re seeing as an Einstein ring is directly behind the object that is the gravitational lens.

Gravitational lensing is predicted by Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Instead of light from a source traveling in a straight line (in three dimensions), it is bent by the presence of a massive body, which distorts spacetime.

The animation above is a simulation depicting a zoom-in on a Schwarzschild black hole in front of the Milky Way.
  • The first Einstein ring corresponds to the most distorted region of the picture and is clearly depicted by the galactic disc.
  • The zoom then reveals a series of 4 extra rings, increasingly thinner and closer to the black hole shadow. They are easily seen through the multiple images of the galactic disk.
The odd-numbered rings correspond to [images of objects] which are behind the black hole (from the observer’s point of view);  they correspond here to the bright yellow region of the galactic disc (close to the galactic center).
The even-numbered rings correspond to images of objects which are behind the observer.  These objects appear bluer since the corresponding part of the galactic disc is thinner and hence dimmer.  [WP]

SOURCE:  Einstein ring - Wikipedia).
The animation was created by Wikipedia contributor Urbane Legend.

This is pretty freaking amazing as a gif….wowzer.

the-unpopular-opinions:

Not so many people should be going to college.

As much as I’ve grown accustomed to the liberal mindset that money-grubbing companies are the reason college grad millennials can’t get work, I concede that it’s more complicated than that. (For the record, I do NOT have a middle class job).
As much as my generation would like to blame the Old Economy Stevens (our parents’ generation) for closing the door of opportunity behind them, we need to acknowledge that there’s more to it than “dey terk err jeerbs”.
First, there are just plain too many of us. Please don’t deny it. As time goes on, automation and technology are supposed to reduce the need for human components in assembly lines, stores, businesses, etc. Sounds good, but where do all those people go who once worked in some particular job that is now being done by a robotic arm, or a self-checkout lane at the grocery store, or a computer program? The answer is nowhere. They’re not needed anymore. In an ideal world, that person would just vanish off the face of the earth, but they don’t. So they have to adapt to survive. Since humans still have to work for a living, they either have to take a different kind of menial work, or else they have to better their skill set.
Second, too many of us are college educated. No, I’m not discriminating against people with crap degrees like English, History, and Womens’ Studies, (although those and others like them truly are a waste of time and money in an increasingly competitive society), I mean there are too many college graduates out there period. Fifty years ago, going to college was something special (and not because it cost so much. It cost less than it does today). Nowadays, everyone does it. In fact, everyone is kind of expected to do it. The world of jobs runs as a function of supply and demand as well. Since there’s an overabundance of supply (kids with college degrees), the demand goes down, because demands for new-hires, etc are already being met and then some. So businesses start getting very picky about who they hire.
The world is bigger than you and your collective cries for employment and prosperity, and such a cry runs counter to the flow of technological advancement. Yes, wealth is horribly unequally distributed, but at the same time, using legislation/etc to force businesses to pay higher wages doesn’t mean an ocean of new jobs is going to suddenly spill forth from their loosened Swiss bank accounts. Those jobs are GONE. They’ve been made obsolete. You can try to bring some of the outsourced ones home from overseas, but more and more, machinery is replacing the need for skilled and unskilled labor. While you might recover some customer assistance phone-line job from New Delhi, that doesn’t mean it’ll be there forever, or even the next 10 years as society advances and technology improves. A.I. is big, and one day soon, those annoying automated robots you talk to over the phone lines might actually be smart enough to solve your problem without speaking to a real live person at all.
“Back in the day,” there weren’t just more jobs because the jobs hadn’t been outsourced yet. There were more jobs overall because automation hadn’t taken effect. Yes, we’ve had other, new kinds of jobs spring up over the years (most pertaining to computers), and more jobs overall have also been created via economic growth, but the problem remains, until the human race decides to stop breeding like rabbits, there will always be more people than jobs available to them, no matter how many socialistic regulations we try to impose to force companies to hire more people. Increasing wages is one thing, but job “creation” is a whole other animal.
You don’t like the cutthroat business practices of companies today? Start a worker-owned cooperative. But don’t go to college, get a degree in “political science” and then complain when you have to work an $8/hr job for the next six years before finally giving up on your dream to be a politician.
I myself am doing exactly that. I have a BA in History and don’t have anything else to go with it. No curator emphasis. No teaching credential. No PhD. No JD. No library-science degree. Nothing. I’m now going back to school to pursue something more in-demand and esoteric. I acknowledge my mistake of college degree choice, and not a day goes by I don’t wish I could go back and fix it.

So bottom line… Pro Tips:
1. Don’t have kids.
2. Don’t go to college unless you’re getting something you pretty much KNOW will lead to a job once you get out. Do some research before you start college and try to “find yourself” while in schooling.
3. For god’s sake, don’t have kids. You think competition for work is bad right now? Imagine what it’ll be like for your kid 30 years from now. You’ll both be fighting for the same job opening. It’s already happening in some places.

Well said.

the-unpopular-opinions:

Not so many people should be going to college.

As much as I’ve grown accustomed to the liberal mindset that money-grubbing companies are the reason college grad millennials can’t get work, I concede that it’s more complicated than that. (For the record, I do NOT have a middle class job).

As much as my generation would like to blame the Old Economy Stevens (our parents’ generation) for closing the door of opportunity behind them, we need to acknowledge that there’s more to it than “dey terk err jeerbs”.

First, there are just plain too many of us. Please don’t deny it. As time goes on, automation and technology are supposed to reduce the need for human components in assembly lines, stores, businesses, etc. Sounds good, but where do all those people go who once worked in some particular job that is now being done by a robotic arm, or a self-checkout lane at the grocery store, or a computer program? The answer is nowhere. They’re not needed anymore. In an ideal world, that person would just vanish off the face of the earth, but they don’t. So they have to adapt to survive. Since humans still have to work for a living, they either have to take a different kind of menial work, or else they have to better their skill set.

Second, too many of us are college educated. No, I’m not discriminating against people with crap degrees like English, History, and Womens’ Studies, (although those and others like them truly are a waste of time and money in an increasingly competitive society), I mean there are too many college graduates out there period. Fifty years ago, going to college was something special (and not because it cost so much. It cost less than it does today). Nowadays, everyone does it. In fact, everyone is kind of expected to do it. The world of jobs runs as a function of supply and demand as well. Since there’s an overabundance of supply (kids with college degrees), the demand goes down, because demands for new-hires, etc are already being met and then some. So businesses start getting very picky about who they hire.

The world is bigger than you and your collective cries for employment and prosperity, and such a cry runs counter to the flow of technological advancement. Yes, wealth is horribly unequally distributed, but at the same time, using legislation/etc to force businesses to pay higher wages doesn’t mean an ocean of new jobs is going to suddenly spill forth from their loosened Swiss bank accounts. Those jobs are GONE. They’ve been made obsolete. You can try to bring some of the outsourced ones home from overseas, but more and more, machinery is replacing the need for skilled and unskilled labor. While you might recover some customer assistance phone-line job from New Delhi, that doesn’t mean it’ll be there forever, or even the next 10 years as society advances and technology improves. A.I. is big, and one day soon, those annoying automated robots you talk to over the phone lines might actually be smart enough to solve your problem without speaking to a real live person at all.

“Back in the day,” there weren’t just more jobs because the jobs hadn’t been outsourced yet. There were more jobs overall because automation hadn’t taken effect. Yes, we’ve had other, new kinds of jobs spring up over the years (most pertaining to computers), and more jobs overall have also been created via economic growth, but the problem remains, until the human race decides to stop breeding like rabbits, there will always be more people than jobs available to them, no matter how many socialistic regulations we try to impose to force companies to hire more people. Increasing wages is one thing, but job “creation” is a whole other animal.

You don’t like the cutthroat business practices of companies today? Start a worker-owned cooperative. But don’t go to college, get a degree in “political science” and then complain when you have to work an $8/hr job for the next six years before finally giving up on your dream to be a politician.

I myself am doing exactly that. I have a BA in History and don’t have anything else to go with it. No curator emphasis. No teaching credential. No PhD. No JD. No library-science degree. Nothing. I’m now going back to school to pursue something more in-demand and esoteric. I acknowledge my mistake of college degree choice, and not a day goes by I don’t wish I could go back and fix it.

So bottom line… Pro Tips:

1. Don’t have kids.

2. Don’t go to college unless you’re getting something you pretty much KNOW will lead to a job once you get out. Do some research before you start college and try to “find yourself” while in schooling.

3. For god’s sake, don’t have kids. You think competition for work is bad right now? Imagine what it’ll be like for your kid 30 years from now. You’ll both be fighting for the same job opening. It’s already happening in some places.

Well said.